5 Home Alarm Monitoring Tips from Real Homeowners

Sometimes it can be hard to translate information from back to base alarm monitoring companies into actual benefits for your home … even when it’s written in English! If you’re new to the concept and reality of back to base alarm monitoring, today we remove the jargon and technical terms, and look at what real homeowners have to say about the topic.

“I’m not sure I want to get a security company to monitor my alarm, I’m sure that would be costly”
Rather than giving you the traditional corporate spiel about safety, we’ll let another forum member answer this question. They mentioned that there are DIY alarm kits that you can buy which have a ‘callback’ feature, to alert you if your perimeters have been breached. However, they also mentioned that you will feel terrible if you’re across town or interstate when the call comes. Even if it is a false alarm, having back to base alarm monitoring will let you know that, and save you a lot of stress! And don’t forget all the other reasons for having back to base alarm monitoring for your system…

“If you’re going to alarm the roof cavity, don’t just arm the manhole, because the thin ceiling panels are no match if a crim wants to kick through the ceiling and drop down into a room”
This forum member is absolutely correct; if you’re going to alarm your house for back to base monitoring, you want blanket coverage. A significant proportion of break-ins (don’t worry … not the largest proportion) are conducted by someone known to the homeowner, or someone that has investigated the property first.

“Will the cheaper kits be any good, or will they go off falsely and have other issues?”
Another commenter who has personal experience with self-installed cheap alarms (without back to base alarm monitoring), recounted how the alarm slowly deteriorated in function. First it started going off at 4am (yeouch!); then refused to recognise the door trigger switch; and after a while it came up with an error code that wasn’t in the handbook … which was barely legible anyway.

“The police won’t respond to an alarm being triggered, only reports from real people who can verify a breach in security”
This is correct … unfortunately for both you and your neighbours, if you install a home alarm system and forego your back to base alarm monitoring, your alarm could be sounding for as many hours as it takes for you to come home. False alarms are a fact of life, which is why police response to an alarm activation doesn’t make sense … but having a neutral back to base alarm monitoring company ring you to check, then go investigate themselves, does make sense.

“There are reliable systems out there but most are designed to be connected to the telephone system, so you need a licensed person to install them”
This is absolutely correct. Pacific Security Technology has a nationally issued Security Master License number, and so should any back to base alarm monitoring company, and especially installer, that you utilise.

Home Security Monitoring with biometric locks

Though that fingerprint locks, retina scanners and voice-activated locks only existed in Mission: Impossible? Actually, they’ve been a staple in high-end homes for at least 10 years, and the technology has now advanced to a state where it is dependable, well-featured and affordable enough for the average homeowner. However, home security monitoring with biometric locks is still relatively new to most homeowners- we go over 8 quick facts you should know about it here.
Biometric locks are easy to install and use
Some people assume that biometric locks are difficult to install or use. Actually, they work in exactly the same way as a conventional lock, and are installed in exactly the same way. You may want professional help with the software setup and usage; however this is generally very user-friendly and kept deliberately simply.
You can also do home security monitoring with biometric locks
Some software programs associated with biometric locks have the capability to not only manage different users, but log entries. Given that a small but significant percentage of robberies are committed by somebody known to the homeowner, this home security monitoring feature could be very useful.
Grease, dirt and sweat can affect the reading
Of course, if you have  anything on your fingers that changes the appearance of your fingerprints, it might interfere with the reading. You would simply clean your finger and try again.
Buy local, or ask plenty of questions
Many of the manuals for biometric locks are written overseas, and broken English is obviously not ideal for helping you understand an unfamiliar home security monitoring system. You can get around this by asking your sales consultant for an Australian-based brand, or simply by asking plenty of questions of the consultant to ensure you understand how to operate the lock.
False readings are highly unlikely
The chances that someone has enough points of similarity in their fingerprint to actually activate the lock without authorisation is extremely low; the chance that someone has those points AND wants to enter your house illegally is even lower!
Biometric locks need backup
Given the fact that biometric locks need electricity to work, they should have both battery backup and emergency key access available. Like your home security monitored alarm, you should get a model with inbuilt battery backup. In the case of an extended power outage, you can also get models with key backup. The keyed lock would only open the door if there were no power to the unit, however.

Though that fingerprint locks, retina scanners and voice-activated locks only existed in Mission: Impossible? Actually, they’ve been a staple in high-end homes for at least 10 years, and the technology has now advanced to a state where it is dependable, well-featured and affordable enough for the average homeowner. However, home security monitoring with biometric locks is still relatively new to most homeowners- we go over 8 quick facts you should know about it here.
Biometric locks are easy to install and use

Some people assume that biometric locks are difficult to install or use. Actually, they work in exactly the same way as a conventional lock, and are installed in exactly the same way. You may want professional help with the software setup and usage; however this is generally very user-friendly and kept deliberately simply.
You can also do home security alarm monitoring with biometric locks

Some software programs associated with biometric locks have the capability to not only manage different users, but log entries. Given that a small but significant percentage of robberies are committed by somebody known to the homeowner, this home security monitoring feature could be very useful.
Grease, dirt and sweat can affect the reading

Of course, if you have  anything on your fingers that changes the appearance of your fingerprints, it might interfere with the reading. You would simply clean your finger and try again.

Buy local, or ask plenty of questions

Many of the manuals for biometric locks are written overseas, and broken English is obviously not ideal for helping you understand an unfamiliar home alarm security monitoring system. You can get around this by asking your sales consultant for an Australian-based brand, or simply by asking plenty of questions of the consultant to ensure you understand how to operate the lock.

False readings are highly unlikely

The chances that someone has enough points of similarity in their fingerprint to actually activate the lock without authorisation is extremely low; the chance that someone has those points AND wants to enter your house illegally is even lower!

Biometric locks need backup

Given the fact that biometric locks need electricity to work, they should have both battery backup and emergency key access available. Like your home security monitored alarm, you should get a model with inbuilt battery backup. In the case of an extended power outage, you can also get models with key backup. The keyed lock would only open the door if there were no power to the unit, however.